21 8 / 2014

requiemart:

retrogradeworks:

easilyannoyedcamwhore:

demused-dolls:

bjdconfessions:

i think it’s weird that companies price things for how difficult they are to make (not the materials they use, but for the difficulty of building the object). the consumer, i would think, doesn’t usually look at their BJD’s clothes and go “WOWZA that was hard to make!” but more of a “WOWZA the final product is beautiful!”. i mean, the doll company can do whatever they want, i’m not the boss around here. it’s just weird to me.

Image by BJDConfessions

Why in the world would that be weird?  With most handmade items, the time and effort of creating the item FAR outweighs the actual material cost, so the cost is based on the time and effort involved in the item’s creation, not materials.

If an item took me 10 hours to make but I was able to already use materials that I had on-hand or got for cheap, it’d be crazy for me to price it less than an item that only took me an hour to make but cost me $20 in materials.

Obviously you have to factor in what the market will bear, but charging based on time spent rather than material cost is absolutely normal with many handmade goods.  For example, knitters who do custom work often charge per meter of yarn knitted, because otherwise (like, say, charging 3x material costs) they’re not being paid for their work.

You said it much more eloquently than I did :)

It’s just weird to me the way some people think they should only pay for materials instead of expertise and time spent making them.  What the fuck, people, seriously?

My usual response to this is to tell people to go into the Apple store and offer $5 or so for the current IPhone because that’s about what the raw materials in it are worth and see how far they get.

This seems to be a flavor of the kind of behavior I resent from prospective buyers for many years when buying illustrations or handmade goods. The kind where they will insult your work, degrade you, harass you just to price an item down because they do not want to pay what you’re asking for (as an artist).

Value is subjective. Whether it’s materials, service, or labor, value is subjective.

Most people don’t have any trouble accepting the cost of food or rent. Those are things you need in order to survive so their value is obvious. How about the services of a plumber for a broken faucet? A doctor? When it comes to items or services that address our biological needs or quality of life, the value of that good or service is obvious.

Clothes? Haircut? Books? Music? Depending on your needs or preferences are, you can do without these things too.

When you get to “specialized, luxury goods territory” which would include BJD, illustrations or any handmade good their value depends on interest, passion or rarity. Anything that qualifies as a luxury item or service doesn’t address your “needs” it’s something that you “want.” This is where anyone arguing that luxury items should be made available based on the materials used to make them (materials which were made available based on a different kind of labor/skill) seems to be a form of cognitive dissonance. Just because you don’t “need” it and you “want” it doesn’t mean that an artist or seller doesn’t deserve the same consideration from someone who provides you goods and services for your needs. Providing a luxury service or good requires labor too, that’s worth something whether it addresses a need or a want.

Instead of projecting frustration on an artist for an item that you want but are not willing to pay what it’s worth to you, you might want to ask yourself again what it means for you to acquire that good or service. Obviously it means something to you, it is valuable because you want it. The question is very simply whether you will pay that price or not.

(via nonaptime)

21 8 / 2014

Anonymous said: This is probably going to be a useless note, but I would just like to inform you that I think your creations are incredibly inspiring. I have enough sculpting skill to create something -like- your creations rather than buying them and would probably rather do so (since making neat things for keeps is one of my drives in life), and even though I'd never try to outright copy you (and am unlikely to even sell my works), I wonder how you feel about just providing that seed of inspiration.

homemadehorrors:

beastlies:

Wow, anon(s) bringing the complicated questions today.

This is another issue that most artists find themselves facing at some point.  Inspiring others feels awesome. It means a lot to me when people say that, and I think most creatives would agree with me.

But sometimes it crosses a line.  People go from being inspired to outright copying your work.  Sometimes they don’t even realize they’re doing it. I once emailed someone who had studied my designs and was attempting to make their own Beastlies.  It’s not always easy to find a polite way to send that “Please stop doing this so we don’t have to get lawyers in the mix” email, but I tried to encourage her to find her own style instead of just ripping off the style that I had spent six years creating and refining.  She responded by saying that her work looked like mine because “clay is a very limiting medium,” so she couldn’t possibly help making copies of Beastlies.  That kind of crazybrain bullshit nonsense becomes a real problem for artists: People can get SO inspired by one person’s work that they can’t see past it to ever work on anything that’s actually their own.

So you know… Make stuff! Have a great time! I’m delighted to have been inspiring in some way! But keep in mind that just not trying to copy someone isn’t always enough. You actually have to outright TRY NOT to copy other artists.  I do. Everyone does.  It’s an essential part of being a creative person. 

Great answer to a complicated issue.

Its sometimes tough to define the differences between inspiration and emulation, but its important to keep trying to do just that.

Because I’ve been watching cooking shows while I paint, to me its a bit like having a brilliant meal at your favorite restaurant. It was amazing, and you’re inspired to cook. Brilliant!
Inspiration: You take a striking aspect of the dish (say, the use of a particular spice) and attempt to incorporate that into one of your own tried-and-true recipes.
Emulation: You attempt to re-create the dish in its entirety.

The food comparison breaks down here a bit in that most people don’t then hang out a shingle and proclaim themselves a professional chef with the same frequency as I’ve seen in the art community.

The origins of that dish you attempted to remake are a total mystery to you. It may have been based on the chef’s grandmother’s cooking, by childhood memories of similar meals with family and friends, informed by experimentation with ingredients and refined by education and endless practice.

In trying to emulate that piece, not only are you robbing yourself of the ability to grow through your own process, your copy will never have the ability to speak to people the way the original does because you’ve no earthly idea what’s gone into it…. and that process isn’t yours.

Saying ‘clay is a very limiting medium’ is like saying ‘there are only so many ways to make pasta’. Its as deluded as it is silly (and my Italian friend would probably throw something at you).

You absolutely have to actively try to find a distinct style for your own work. Actively trying to make something that is genuinely different (and no, gluing sparkles on someone else’s design doesn’t count - yes, someone tried that) is an important part of the process because it involves thinking critically about your work.

Ask some friends you can trust to be honest. Where possible, ask artists you admire for a critique (and be prepared to gracefully accept what they say).
Be inspired, but make sure the root of your work is still you.

21 8 / 2014

humblezombie:

I think I’m almost done with sculpting Mo, the mosaic custom’s, head.  The plastic spikes are actually pretty sharp, not my safest custom ^^;

This one’s my fave of your recent sculpted MH dollies! =D

20 8 / 2014

berniesu:

Btw - if you want to ask me about Frankenstein starting, Emma Approved or whatever please feel free. - http://berniesu.com/ask

Q: I love Frankenstein MD so far! Two questions. One, what is the uploading schedule? Two, out of curiosity, why did you and the PD/FMD team decide to put three…

20 8 / 2014

vforenterasan:

Akinobu makes architectural models for a living in Tokyo, but in his spare time he creates all matter of small objects in bottles. These pinky sized dinosaur skeletons are especially awesome. (via bb)

TÜRKÇE

Akinobu Tokyo’da bir yaşam için mimari modeller yapar, ama onun boş zamanlarında o her madde oluştururşişelerde küçük nesneler . Bu serçe büyüklüğünde dinozor iskeletleri özellikle harika. (Via bb )

(via wee-little-things)

20 8 / 2014

requiemart:

retrogradeworks:

easilyannoyedcamwhore:

demused-dolls:

bjdconfessions:

i think it’s weird that companies price things for how difficult they are to make (not the materials they use, but for the difficulty of building the object). the consumer, i would think, doesn’t usually look at their BJD’s clothes and go “WOWZA that was hard to make!” but more of a “WOWZA the final product is beautiful!”. i mean, the doll company can do whatever they want, i’m not the boss around here. it’s just weird to me.

Image by BJDConfessions

Why in the world would that be weird?  With most handmade items, the time and effort of creating the item FAR outweighs the actual material cost, so the cost is based on the time and effort involved in the item’s creation, not materials.

If an item took me 10 hours to make but I was able to already use materials that I had on-hand or got for cheap, it’d be crazy for me to price it less than an item that only took me an hour to make but cost me $20 in materials.

Obviously you have to factor in what the market will bear, but charging based on time spent rather than material cost is absolutely normal with many handmade goods.  For example, knitters who do custom work often charge per meter of yarn knitted, because otherwise (like, say, charging 3x material costs) they’re not being paid for their work.

You said it much more eloquently than I did :)

It’s just weird to me the way some people think they should only pay for materials instead of expertise and time spent making them.  What the fuck, people, seriously?

My usual response to this is to tell people to go into the Apple store and offer $5 or so for the current IPhone because that’s about what the raw materials in it are worth and see how far they get.

19 8 / 2014

pemberleydigital:

Welcome to the world of vfrankmd! Check out the series premiere of Frankenstein, MD starring Anna Lore, Steve Zaragoza, Brendan Bradley, and Sara Fletcher. 

_____________

18 8 / 2014

viistar:

adurot:

viistar:

6” MLP Mythological Rarity Auction 

Rarity - now with hoofer floofers and lushes lashes!

Ebay:  http://cgi.ebay.com/ws/eBayISAPI.dll?ViewItem&item=301282168678

Youtube: http://youtu.be/OWHwPmyM5Yo

Did her beard break off? I hate those little fiddle pieces that snap easily…

I thought about that - however I figure this is Rarity and the moment a single chin hair would appear she would pluck it, let alone allow a full beard to form!  XD

17 8 / 2014

so-i-did-this-thing:

feriowind:

ohmyGOD I found Simon Lee’s facebook page and LOOK AT ALL THESE KAIJU (AND SO MANY THAT WERE UNUSED IN THE FILM)

SERIOUSLY I WANT TO CRY, THEY’RE ALL SO BEAUTIFUL!!!

His facebook page is here!!!

I AM SORRY, ONIBABA, BUT STINGRAY KAIJU IS NOW MY BABY.

(via feralworks)

16 8 / 2014